Cheapest NAS Option


#21

I am sure this will work, I am not sure if it will work well. So definitely let us know.

$150 seems like a pretty good deal. Did you get any hard drives with it? With 4-bays, it will give you flexibility to grow.

Ultimately, you could add a computer to your network to do the heavy lifting, and keep the NAS just for file storage. That works well for a lot of people.


#22

It will work, but as TeddyR stated, Commercial Detection takes a while. I ran with one for a month and was happy with it as a DVR. I was not using it for transcoding with Plex, but I did use it as my plex server as well. Additionally I paired it with HDHomeRun Extends so all my content was transcoded at time of recording…

I did end up moving to a PR4100 more because I could consolidate a lot of storage under it, and remove the need to have both a NAS and MacMini in the picture. (And I do now love the ability to watch remotely (which uses the transcoding ability of the NAS))


#23

This all sounds kinda more complicated than I was hoping. I just want a turn key DVR solution if at all possible, on my Apple TV. I’m not crazy about the prospects of buying, setting up and managing a server. I already have an Apple TV, an HDHomeRun Connect and an HDTV outdoor antenna. That’s about as complicated as I want to get with hardware.

Ideally, I’d be willing to pay for a turn key solution that I can just subscribe to with cloud storage. If Cloud storage is not an option, then the ability to simply buy a 1-3 Terabyte USB drive to store recordings as a plug and play solution would be my second best option.

For scheduling recordings, I would expect that the Channels app interface on my Apple TV would be best for that.

Short of options 1 and 2 above, can someone give a summary of options in simple language from least to greatest in terms of cost?

I have an older iMac all in one 21" downstairs that the kids use occasionally. Would that work? It has a 3.06 GHz Core i3 processor with 4GB Ram and 225GB free space.


#24

What you want is a NAS then. You can pick up a 2 bay NAS that would support everything in Channels for around $300. Drop 2 hard drives in it, and install Channels DVR and you’re done.

This is exactly how it works.

Your iMac might work, but you need more storage as HD recordings are around 8gb per hour. You could certainly install Channels DVR on it and try it out. If it’s something you’d like to keep using, just pick up a larger USB hard drive and use that.our iMac might work, but you need more storage as HD recordings are around 8gb per hour. You could certainly install Channels DVR on it and try it out. If it’s something you’d like to keep using, just pick up a larger USB hard drive and use that.


Can I run Channels DVR on a 3.06 Ghz Core i3 iMac?
#25

I agree with maddox, a NAS is the closest to a plug-and-play solution and closest to your desired setup that you will find.

The problem with a NAS, in general, is processing power (on a budget NAS). They are essentially hard drives with relatively weak computers built into them, unless you spend a great deal more.

The next simplest solution is to get a small computer, such as a NUC, and run it “headless”. Then, plug in 1 or more external hard drives for storage. Such a setup can be small, energy efficient, and quiet, but significantly more powerful than a NAS.


#26

3 posts were split to a new topic: macOS Lion installation (mid-2007 mac mini)


macOS Lion installation (mid-2007 mac mini)
#28

How much storage/hr with 720p?


#29

“What you want is a NAS then. You can pick up a 2 bay NAS that would support everything in Channels for around $300. Drop 2 hard drives in it, and install Channels DVR and you’re done.”

If I use a NAS, I need to install a Channels DVR package on the NAS. Do I need a Mac, at least for a few minutes, to complete that step? Or can the NAS install be done via a LINUX or even Windows machine?

Also is there any reason to not choose an HD Homerun Extend over Connect? In other words does the compression done for Extend also provide some benefit to a non-wifi user? Thank you.


#30

NAS installation involves downloading the appropriate package from our site and uploading it into your NAS, via the web admin interface offered by the device. You can do this on any computer- a Mac is not required.


#31

I’m in the UK and we only have access to the Connect here which works perfectly fine. However I’m guessing the Extend would result in smaller file sizes for recordings and mean your router is using doing less work due to the transcoding.
Just on the subject of devices, do you guys have access to this one in the U.S, the Tech4-8CH?


#32

In the UK, all your channels are already using H264 so there is no need for the EXTEND.


#33

Damn, I never knew that. I knew streaming services were using it of course, but didn’t realise it could be done with live broadcast signal. Hence the reason why SD have never bothered releasing the Extend in the U.K then.
This other unit (Tech4-8CH) looks likes 4 Connects rolled into one. Just thinking it maybe of use to some of you guys in the US as I’ve seen a couple of people mention how they have 3-4 of the Extends or Connects so they can have multiple antennas in different directions. Power consumption must be a killer.


#34

Well, all our HD channels are H.264 and a few SD channels that also happen to be on the DVB-T2 muxes (PSB3, COM7, COM8). All the channels on the DVB-T muxes are still MPEG2.


#35

So following up on cheapest NAS option… what’s the bottom line? What do you recommend that’s a good price and has enough power???


#36

I’m a total novice with all this, but i have set up Channels, HDHomerun Connect and an antenna. Looks like i need a NAS storage device now. I saw a Seagate 3TB recommended. When i set that up i would need to use a laptop on the same network (right?) to get everything installed, but once that is done can i unplug the laptop and leave the Seagate to run, or do i need a computer attached to the storage at all times too?


#37

Just t be clear, it’s best to use model names to avoid any confusion on which NAS you mean.


#38

There needs to be an always-on computer of some sort to be able to run the DVR and make recordings. That means either a laptop or desktop computer with a USB attached drive, OR a NAS which is basically a mini-computer with a harddrive.

The Seagate 3TB is a regular usb drive (not a NAS), so you would need to leave the laptop plugged in and on at all times.

If you get a NAS instead, from Synology or QNAP, it doesn’t need to be connected to a computer at all and instead of USB it plugs into your router with Ethernet (just like the HDHomeRun).


#39

Ok, that helps me a lot. I thought the Seagate has the computer built in too. That would’ve been a waste as I don’t have an old laptop to leave on.
Sounds like I need a NAS, which is something I had never even heard of until this weekend!
If I am recording only 6 or 7 hours per week of broadcasting and nothing else (and deleting after watching) what is a good recommendation for something that is good value for money?
Thanks again for the help!


#40

I did a little research and was wondering if the WD MyCloud 2TB plugged into my router would do the trick? I have a small laundry room closet with the router, HD Homerun Connect and my antenna (not sure how it works in a closet, but i get 49 OTA channels with it). I don’t want to look at running a laptop in that space, but if the MyCloud works for recording a couple of TV shows per week and nothing else, then would it work for me?


#41

That won’t work. I would like to see more in the $135 range too.

I think the best thing for this is a NUC like this:

It’s $215 and you add a cheap 240GB SSD for $65.it runs windows 10, so no Linux needed. Then if you ever want to repurpose it, you can. I bought mine barebones and installed Ubuntu and saved about $50 by not getting windows.

I’m like you and record a few more hours a week and delete as I go and my 150GB drive is only ever about 35% full.